By: Dustin Nelson |

Utilities are both excellent and horrible. It’s obviously great to have gas for the stove and electricity for, well, playing charging your phone and seeing at night. But they’re always hiding just out of sight when you’re thinking about your mortgage or rent.

What you pay for electricity varies not only on how much you use but where you live. That second part probably isn’t something you pay a whole lot of attention to unless you’re moving to a new state. A new set of maps from HowMuch.net reveals just how much the costs can vary from state to state, and it might be more than you’d think.

The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) says the average household will spend 12.70 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity. But there are states where the costs are more than double that. So HowMuch.net took data from the EIA to create a trio of maps that look at the cents per KWh in residential, commercial, and industrial spaces for each state.

The states that pay the most in residential costs are Hawaii (32.09), Rhode Island (22.67), Massachusetts (22.57), Alaska (21.74), and Connecticut (21.56).

At the other end of the spectrum, you have Missouri (9.28), North Dakota (9.16), Arkansas (9.03), Louisiana (8.84), and Oklahoma (8.80). Take a look below to see how the rates for industrial and commercial spaces stack up.